REGULATIONS(REMITTANCES)


  FAQs - REMITTANCES

 

Please click on  LIBERALISED REMITTANCE SCHEME (LRS)  to reach Master Direction on the subject.   

 

         

    

OTHER REMITTANCES:                                                                         (UPDATED 6th November 2018)

Following is the gist of important provisions relating to Other Remittances as available in RBI-Master Direction on Other Remittance Facilities. For full details readers are requested to go through the Directions available on RBI website www.rbi.org.in -> Notifications -> Master Directions -> Foreign Exchange Management ->Other Remittance Facilities .

1. Release of Foreign Exchange by Authorised Dealers

1.1 For release of foreign exchange to persons resident in India for various current account transactions, Authorised Dealer banks are to be guided by the Rules made by the Government of India under Section 5 of the Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999 which are detailed in the Foreign Exchange Management (Current Account Transactions) Rules, 2000 (hereinafter referred to as the Rules) notified by the Government of India vide Notification No. G.S.R.381 (E) dated May 3, 2000, (Annex-1) as amended from time to time. In terms of the said Rules, drawal of foreign exchange for certain categories of transactions listed in Schedule I is expressly prohibited. Exchange facilities for transactions included in Schedule II to the Rules may be permitted by the Authorised Dealer banks provided the applicant has secured the approval from the Ministry/Department of the Government of India as specified therein. In respect of transactions included in Schedule III to the Rules, prior approval of the Reserve Bank would be required for remittance exceeding the specified limits. The release of foreign exchange up to the threshold ceilings specified in Schedule III stands delegated to the Authorised Dealer banks. All applications for release of foreign exchange exceeding the limits as prescribed in Schedule III to the Rules should be referred to the Regional Office concerned of the Foreign Exchange Department of the Reserve Bank, under whose jurisdiction the applicant is functioning / residing.

1.2 “Drawal” of foreign exchange also includes use of International Credit Cards (ICC), International Debit Cards (IDC), ATM cards, etc. “Currency”, interalia, includes ICC, IDC and ATM Cards. Accordingly, all Rules, Regulations made and Direction issued under the Act apply to the use of ICC, IDC and ATM Cards.

1.3 Release of foreign exchange is not admissible for travel to and transaction with residents of Nepal and Bhutan.

1.4 Prohibition:

Remittances in any form towards participation in lottery schemes are prohibited under the Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999. Further, these restrictions are also applicable to remittances for participation in lottery like schemes existing under different names like money circulation scheme or remittances for the purpose of securing prize money/awards, etc.

1.5 Fraudulent offers:

There is a spate of fictitious offers of cheap funds in recent times from fraudsters through letters, e-mails, mobile phones, SMS, etc. Communications on fake letterheads of the Reserve Bank and purportedly signed by its top executives / senior officials are also being sent to targeted people. Many residents have been victims of such offers and lost huge money in the process. The Reserve Bank has alerted the public on several occasions about such fictitious schemes/ offers, through the print and the electronic media.

Fraudsters are seeking money from gullible people, under different heads, such as processing fees/ transaction fees/tax clearance charges/conversion charges, clearing fees, etc. The victims of the fraud have also been persuaded to deposit the amount in accounts with banks in India, and such amounts have been withdrawn immediately. Multiple accounts are being opened in the name of individuals or proprietary concerns, at different bank branches for collecting the transaction charges, etc. AD Category – I banks must, therefore, exercise due caution and to be extra vigilant while opening or allowing transactions in such accounts. Any person resident in India collecting and effecting / remitting such payments directly /indirectly outside India would make himself/ herself liable to be proceeded against with, for contravention of the Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999, besides being liable for violation of regulations relating to Know Your Customer (KYC) norms / Anti Money Laundering (AML) standards. The Reserve Bank of India does not maintain any account in the name of individuals / companies / trusts in India to hold funds for disbursal.

2. Release of Foreign Exchange by Authorised Dealer Category II

In order to provide adequate foreign exchange facilities and efficient customer service, the Reserve Bank has decided to grant licenses to certain entities by authorising them as Authorised Dealer – Category II to undertake a range of non-trade current account transactions. Accordingly, Authorised Dealer – Category II are authorised to release / remit foreign exchange for the following non-trade current account transactions:

  1. Private visits,
  2. Remittance by tour operators / travel agents to overseas agents / principals / hotels,
  3. Business travel,
  4. Fee for participation in global conferences and specialized training,
  5. Remittance for participation in international events / competitions (towards training, sponsorship and prize money),
  6. Film shooting,
  7. Medical treatment abroad,
  8. Disbursement of crew wages,
  9. Overseas education,
  10. Remittance under educational tie up arrangements with universities abroad,
  11. Remittance towards fees for examinations held in India and abroad and additional score sheets for GRE, TOEFL, etc.
  12. Employment and processing, assessment fees for overseas job applications,
  13. Emigration and emigration consultancy fees,
  14. Skills / credential assessment fees for intending migrants,
  15. Visa fees,
  16. Processing fees for registration of documents as required by the Portuguese / other Governments,
  17. Registration / subscription / membership fees to International Organisations.

3. Remittance facilities for resident individuals:

Remittances for current account transactions (viz. private visit; gift/donation; going abroad on employment; emigration; maintenance of close relatives abroad; business trip; medical treatment abroad; studies abroad) available to resident individuals under Para 1 of Schedule III to Foreign Exchange Management (Current Account Transactions) Amendment Rules, 2015 dated May 26, 2015 are subsumed under the Liberalised Remittance Scheme (LRS) of USD 2,50,000 per Financial Year (FY) with effect from May 26, 2015 [Instructions on LRS are available on Master Direction on Liberalised Remittance Scheme dated January 1, 2016]. Release of foreign exchange exceeding USD 2,50,000, requires prior permission from the Reserve Bank of India.

3.1 Travel:

3.1.1 Out of the overall foreign exchange (USD 250,000 per financial year) being sold to a traveller, exchange in the form of foreign currency notes and coins may be sold up to the limit indicated below:

  1. Travellers proceeding to countries other than Iraq, Libya, Islamic Republic of Iran, Russian Federation and other Republics of Commonwealth of Independent States – not exceeding USD 3000 per visit or its equivalent.
  2. Travellers proceeding to Iraq or Libya – not exceeding USD 5000 per visit or its equivalent.
  3. Travellers proceeding to Islamic Republic of Iran, Russian Federation and other Republics of Commonwealth of Independent States – full exchange may be released.
  4. Travellers proceeding for Haj/Umrah pilgrimage- full amount of entitlement in cash or up to the cash limit as specified by the Haj Committee of India, may be released.

3.1.2 Authorised Dealers may remit foreign exchange up to a reasonable limit, at the request of a traveller towards his hotel accommodation, tour arrangements, etc., in the countries proposed to be visited by him. Further, all tour related expenses including cost of rail/road/water transportation charges outside India and remittances relating towards cost of Euro Rail; passes/tickets, etc. for Indian travellers, and overseas hotel/flight charges have been subsumed under the new enhanced LRS limit of USD 250,000.

3.1.3 Period of surrender of foreign exchange

(i) In case the foreign exchange purchased for a specific purpose is not utilized for that purpose, it could be utilized for any other eligible purpose for which drawal of foreign exchange is permitted under the relevant Rules / Regulation.

(ii) General permission is available to any resident individual to surrender received / realised / unspent / unused foreign exchange to an Authorised Person within a period of 180 days from the date of receipt / realisation / purchase / acquisition / date of return of the traveller, as the case may be.

Note: Where a person approaches an Authorised Person for surrender of unspent/ unutilized foreign exchange after the prescribed period of 180 days, Authorised Person should not refuse to purchase the foreign exchange merely on the ground that the prescribed period has expired.

(iii) The liberalised uniform time limit of 180 days is applicable only to resident individuals and in areas other than export of goods and services. In all other cases, the regulations / directions on surrender requirement shall remain unchanged. (Notification No. FEMA 9/2000-RB dated May 3, 2000, as amended from time to time).

3.1.4 Unspent foreign exchange

A returning traveller is permitted to retain with him, foreign currency, travellers’ cheques and currency notes up to an aggregate amount of USD 2000 and foreign coins without any ceiling beyond 180 days. Foreign exchange so retained, can be utilized by the traveller for his subsequent visit abroad.

3.2 Remittance of salary

A person who is resident but not permanently resident in India and

a. is a citizen of a foreign State other than Pakistan; or

b. is a citizen of India, who is on deputation to the office or branch of a foreign company or subsidiary or joint venture in India of such foreign company, may make remittance up to his net salary (after deduction of taxes, contribution to provident fund and other deductions).

Explanation: For the purpose of this item, a person resident in India on account of his employment or deputation of a specified duration (irrespective of length thereof) or for a specific job or assignments, the duration of which does not exceed three years, is a resident but not permanently resident.

3.3. Meeting of medical expenses of NRI close relatives by resident individuals

Where the medical expenses in respect of NRI close relative (relative as defined in Section 2 (77) of the Companies Act, 2013) are paid by a resident individual, such a payment being in the nature of a resident to resident transaction may be covered under the term “services related thereto” under Regulation 2(i) of Notification No. FEMA 16 /2000- RB dated May 3, 2000.

3.4. International Credit Cards/International Debit Cards/Store value cards etc. by Authorised Dealers in India:

3.4.1. International Credit Cards (ICC)

  1. The restrictions contained in Rule 5 of the Foreign Exchange Management (Current Account Transactions) Rules, 2000 will not be applicable for use of International Credit Cards (ICCs) by residents for making payment towards expenses, while on a visit outside India.
  2. Residents can use ICCs on internet for any purpose for which exchange can be purchased from an Authorised Dealer in India, e.g. for import of books, purchase of downloadable software or import of any other item permissible under Foreign Trade Policy (FTP).
  3. ICCs cannot be used on internet or otherwise for purchase of prohibited items, like lottery tickets, banned or proscribed magazines, participation in sweepstakes, payment for call-back services, etc., since no drawal of foreign exchange is permitted for such items/activities.
  4. There is no aggregate monetary ceiling separately prescribed for use of ICCs through internet.
  5. Resident individuals maintaining foreign currency accounts with an Authorised Dealer in India or a bank abroad, as permissible under extant Foreign Exchange Regulations, are free to obtain ICCs issued by overseas banks and other reputed agencies. The charges incurred against the card either in India or abroad, can be met out of funds held in such foreign currency account/s of the card holder or through remittances, if any, from India only through a bank where the card holder has a current or savings account. The remittance for this purpose should also be made directly to the card issuing agency abroad, and not to a third party. The applicable limit will be the credit limit fixed by the card issuing banks. There is no monetary ceiling fixed by the Reserve Bank for remittances, if any, under this facility.
  6. Use of ICC for payment in foreign exchange in Nepal and Bhutan is not permitted.
  7. ADs may issue ICCs to NRIs/PIOs, without prior approval of the Reserve Bank, subject to the condition that charges on the use of ICCs should be settled by the concerned NRIs/PIOs only out of inward remittances or balances held in their Non-Resident External (NRE) Accounts/ Foreign Currency Non-Resident (FCNR) Accounts.

3.4.2. International Debit Cards (IDC)

  1. Banks authorised to deal in foreign exchange may issue International Debit Cards (IDCs) which can be used by a resident for drawing cash or making payment to a merchant establishment overseas during his visit abroad. IDCs can be used only for permissible current account transactions and the limits as mentioned in the Schedules to the Rules, as amended from time to time, are equally applicable to payments made through use of these cards.
  2. The IDCs cannot be used on internet for purchase of prohibited items like lottery tickets, banned or proscribed magazines, participation in sweepstakes, payment for call-back services, etc., i.e. for such items/activities for which drawal of foreign exchange is not permitted.

3.4.3. Use of credit / debit cards for payments for airline tickets

In certain cases where the payment for the tickets are made by the residents using credit /debit card, Card Companies have been providing arrangements to the foreign airlines operating in India to select the country and currency of their choice, in respect of transactions arising from the sale of the air tickets in India in Indian Rupees (INR). In such transactions, the overseas bank as the acquiring bank receives the funds from card issuing company in its Vostro account maintained with an Authorised Dealer bank in India or in its foreign currency account maintained abroad and makes the payment in foreign currency overseas to the foreign airline. This practice adopted by foreign airlines is not in conformity with the extant provisions of the Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999. AD Category- I banks may, therefore, advise the foreign airlines to discontinue the practice of using overseas banks for settlement of INR transactions on account of sale of air tickets in India.

3.4.4. Store Value Cards/ Charge Cards/ Smart Cards, etc.

Authorised Dealer banks may issue Store Value Card/ Charge Card/ Smart Card to residents traveling on private/business visit abroad which are used for making payments at overseas merchant establishments and also for drawing cash from ATM terminals. No prior permission from the Reserve Bank is required for issue of such cards. However, the use of such cards is limited to permissible current account transactions and subject to the prescribed limits under the FEM (CAT) Rules, 2000, as amended from time to time.

3.4.5. Redemption of unutilized balance on prepaid travel cards:

Resident Indians who purchase their travel cards, are permitted refund of the unutilized foreign exchange balance only after 10 days from the date of last transaction and accordingly, this condition is stated in the “user guide”. Since these cards are expected to act as substitutes for cash/ Travellers Cheques, the facilities available to the user will have to be similar. Accordingly, all such Authorised Persons shall redeem the unutilized balance outstanding in the cards immediately upon request by the resident Indians to whom the cards are issued subject to retention of:

  1. Amounts that are authorized and remain unclaimed/ not settled by the acquirers as of the date of redemption till the completion of the respective settlement cycle;
  2. A small balance not exceeding US$ 100, for meeting any pipeline transactions till the completion of the respective settlement cycle; and
  3. Transaction fees / service tax payable in India in Rupees.
  4. For the amount that are authorized but unclaimed/ not settled by the acquirer, the issuer of such cards can hold such amounts until such transactions are processed/ settled by the acquirers within the prescribed settlement timeframe.

4. Remittance facilities for others:

4.1. Gift/donation

General permission is available to persons other than individuals to remit towards donations up-to one per cent of their foreign exchange earnings during the previous three financial years or USD 5,000,000, whichever is less, for (a) creation of Chairs in reputed educational institutes, (b) contribution to funds (not being an investment fund) promoted by educational institutes; and (c) contribution to a technical institution or body or association in the field of activity of the donor Company. Any additional remittance in excess of the same shall require prior approval of the Reserve Bank of India. Applications for remittances for purposes other than those specified above may be forwarded to the Chief General Manager, Reserve Bank of India, Central Office, Foreign Exchange Department, Foreign Investments Division (EPD), Central Office Building, Mumbai-400 001, together with (a) details of their foreign exchange earnings during the last 3 years, (b) brief background of the company’s activities, (c) purpose of the donation and (d) likely benefits to the corporate.2

4.2. Commission to agents abroad for sale of residential flats or commercial plots in India

Remittances by persons other than individuals shall require prior approval of the Reserve Bank of India if commission per transaction to agents abroad for sale of residential flats or commercial plots in India exceeds USD 25,000 or five percent of the inward remittance whichever is more.

4.3. Remittances towards consultancy services

Remittances by persons other than individuals shall require prior approval of the Reserve Bank of India if remittances exceed USD 10,000,000 per project for any consultancy services in respect of infrastructure projects and USD 1,000,000 per project, for other consultancy services procured from outside India.

Explanation:—For the purposes of this sub-paragraph, the expression “infrastructure’ shall mean as defined in explanation to para 1(iv)(A)(a) of Schedule I of FEMA Notification 3/2000-RB, dated the May 3, 2000, as amended from time to time.

4.4. Remittances towards re-imbursement of pre-incorporation expenses

Remittances by persons other than individuals shall require prior approval of the Reserve Bank of India for remittances exceeding five per cent of investment brought into India or USD 100,000 whichever is higher, by an entity in India by way of reimbursement of pre-incorporation expenses.

4.5. Payment of fees in foreign currency – Embassy affiliated educational institutions

Authorised Dealers may sell foreign exchange towards payment of fees to schools/educational institutions under the administrative control of foreign embassies.

4.6. Remittance towards payments of collected subscription to overseas TV media company

Authorised dealers may allow cable operators or collection agents in India of overseas TV media companies, to remit subscription collected from subscribers in India/advertisement charges collected from the advertisers who are eligible to advertise on overseas TV channels without any prior permission from the Reserve Bank.

4.7. Bids in foreign currency for projects to be executed in India

Persons resident in India are permitted to incur liability in foreign exchange and to make or to receive payments in foreign exchange, in respect of global bids where the Central Government has authorised such projects to be executed in India. In such cases, authorised dealers may sell foreign exchange to the concerned resident Indian company which has been awarded the contract.

4.8. Sale of overseas telephone cards

Authorised Dealers may allow agents in India of the overseas organisations issuing pre-paid telephone cards to remit the sale proceeds of such cards, net of their commission, to the issuers of the telephone cards.

4.9. Liberalization of foreign technical collaboration agreements

AD Category-I banks may permit drawal of foreign exchange by persons for payment of royalty and lump-sum payment under technical collaboration agreements without the approval of Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Government of India.

4.10. Drawal of foreign exchange for remittance for purchase of trademark or franchise in India

AD Category-I banks may permit drawal of foreign exchange by person for purchase of trademark or franchise in India without approval of the Reserve Bank.

4.11. Remittances for making tour arrangements by agents

4.11.1. Authorised Dealers may effect remittances at the request of agents in India who have tie-up arrangements with hotels/ agents, etc., abroad for providing hotel accommodation or making other tour arrangements for travel from India, provided the Authorised Dealer is satisfied that the remittance is being made out of the foreign exchange purchased by the traveller concerned from an Authorised Person (including exchange drawn for private travel abroad) in accordance with the Rules, Regulations and Direction in force.

4.11.2. Authorised Dealer may open foreign currency accounts in the name of agents in India who have tie up arrangements with hotels/ agents, etc., abroad for providing hotel accommodation or making other tour arrangements for travellers from India provided:-

i) the credits to the account are by way of depositing

  1. collections made in foreign exchange from travellers; and
  2. refunds received from outside India on account of cancellation of bookings / tour arrangements, etc., and

ii) the debits in foreign exchange are for making payments towards hotel accommodation, tour arrangements, etc., outside India.

4.11.3. Authorised Dealer may allow tour operators to remit the cost of rail/ road/ water/transportation charges outside India without any prior approval from the Reserve Bank, net of commission/ mark up due to the agent. The sale of passes/ ticket in India can be made either against the payment in Indian Rupees or in foreign exchange released for visits abroad.

4.11.4. In respect of consolidated tours arranged by travel agents in India for foreign tourists visiting India and neighbouring countries like Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, etc., against advance payments/ reimbursement through an Authorised Dealer, part of the foreign exchange received in India against such consolidated tour arrangement, may require to be remitted from India to these neighbouring countries for services rendered by travel agents and hoteliers in these countries. Authorised Dealer may allow such remittances after verifying that the amount being remitted to the neighbouring countries (inclusive of remittances, if any, already made against the tour) does not exceed the amount actually remitted to India and the country of residence of the beneficiary is not Pakistan.

5. Issue of Guarantee – Import of service

5.1. AD Category-I banks are permitted to issue guarantee for amount not exceeding USD 500,000 or its equivalent in favour of a non-resident service provider, on behalf of a resident customer who is a service importer, provided:

  1. The AD Category-I bank is satisfied about the bonafides of the transaction.
  2. The AD Category-I bank ensures submission of documentary evidence for import of services in the normal course.
  3. The guarantee is to secure a direct contractual liability arising out of a contract between a resident and a non-resident.

5.2. In the case of a Public Sector Company or a Department/ Undertaking of the Government of India/ State Governments, approval from the Ministry of Finance, Government of India for issue of guarantee for an amount exceeding USD 100,000 (USD One hundred thousand) or its equivalent would be required.

6. Operational instructions to Authorised Persons

6.1. Reserve Bank will not prescribe the documents which should be verified by the Authorised Persons while permitting remittances for various transactions, particularly of current account.

6.2. In terms of the provisions contained in sub-section 5 of section 10 of the Act, before undertaking any transaction in foreign exchange on behalf of any person, an Authorised Dealer is required to obtain a declaration and such other information from the person (applicant) on whose behalf the transaction is being undertaken that will reasonably satisfy him that the transaction is not designed to contravene or evade the provisions of the Act or any of the Rules or Regulations made or Notifications or directions or orders issued under the Act. Authorised Dealers should preserve the information / documents obtained by them from the applicant before undertaking the transactions for verification by the Reserve Bank. The onus of furnishing the correct details in the application, will remain with the applicant who has certified the details relating to the purpose of such remittance.

6.3. In case the person on whose behalf the transaction is being undertaken refuses or does not give satisfactory compliance of the requirements of an authorised person, he shall refuse in writing to undertake the transactions and shall, if he has reasons to believe that any contravention / evasion is contemplated by the person, report the matter to the Reserve Bank.

6.4. For payments other than imports and remittances covering intermediary trade transactions, applicant needs to fill up Form A2 (Annex 2). The Form A2 should be retained for a period of one year by the Authorised Persons, together with the related documents, for the purpose of verification by their Internal Auditors.

6.5. For effecting current account remittances not exceeding USD 25,000 Authorised Dealers need only a simple letter from the applicant containing the basic information, viz., names and the addresses of the applicant and the beneficiary, amount to be remitted and the purpose of remittance. However, this is subject to the condition that the payment is made by a cheque drawn on the applicant’s bank account or by a Demand Draft. AD banks shall prepare dummy A-2 so as to enable them to provide purpose of remittance for statistical inputs for Balance of Payment.

6.6. With a view to facilitating miscellaneous remittances and reducing paperwork associated with payment transactions, Authorised Dealer banks, offering internet banking facilities to their customers may allow online submission of Form A2. Besides, they may also enable uploading/submission of documents, if and as may be necessary, to establish the permissibility of the remittances under the extant rules or regulations framed under FEMA, 1999. Remittances that do not require any documentation (e.g. certain transactions under the LRS) may be put through on the basis of the Form A2 alone. To start with, remittances on the basis of online submission alone will be available for transactions with an upper limit of USD 25,000 (or its equivalent) for individuals and USD 100,000 (or its equivalent) for corporates. It may be noted that the remittance will be subject to satisfaction of the Authorised Dealer banks as laid down in Section 10 (5) of FEMA. Accordingly, Authorised Dealer banks may frame appropriate guidelines for customer interface personnel to ensure ease of transactions for the customers within the ambit of the statutory/regulatory provisions. Appropriate changes in technology and/or operating procedure may be carried out by Authorised Dealer banks immediately.

7. Income- tax clearance

Reserve Bank of India will not issue any instructions under the FEMA, regarding the procedure to be followed in respect of deduction of tax at source while allowing remittances to the non-residents. It shall be mandatory on the part of Authorised Dealers to comply with the requirement of the tax laws, as applicable.

LIBERALISED REMITTANCE SCHEME (LRS)                                        (UPDATED 20th  June 2018)

Following is the gist of important provisions relating to LRS as available in RBI-Master Direction on Liberalised Remittance Scheme (LRS). For full details readers are requested to go through the Directions available on RBI website www.rbi.org.in -> Notifications -> Master Directions -> Foreign Exchange Management ->Liberalised Remittance Scheme (LRS) .

Liberalised Remittance Scheme (LRS) of USD 2,50,000 for resident individuals

1. Under the Liberalised Remittance Scheme, Authorised Dealers may freely allow remittances by resident individuals up to USD 2,50,000 per Financial Year (April-March) for any permitted current or capital account transaction or a combination of both. The Scheme is not available to corporates, partnership firms, HUF, Trusts, etc.

2. The LRS limit has been revised in stages consistent with prevailing macro and micro economic conditions. During the period from February 4, 2004 till date, the LRS limit has been revised as under:

(Amount in USD)
Date Feb 4, 2004 Dec 20, 2006 May 8, 2007 Sep 26, 2007 Aug 14, 2013 Jun 3, 2014 May 26, 2015
LRS limit (USD) 25,000 50,000 1,00,000 2,00,000 75,000 1,25,000 2,50,000

3. The Scheme is available to all resident individuals including minors. In case of remitter being a minor, the Form A2 must be countersigned by the minor’s natural guardian.

4. Remittances under the Scheme can be consolidated in respect of family members subject to individual family members complying with its terms and conditions. However, clubbing is not permitted by other family members for capital account transactions such as opening a bank account/investment/purchase of property, if they are not the co-owners/co-partners of the overseas bank account/ investment/property. Further, a resident cannot gift to another resident, in foreign currency, for the credit of the latter’s foreign currency account held abroad under LRS.

5. All other transactions which are otherwise not permissible under FEMA and those in the nature of remittance for margins or margin calls to overseas exchanges/ overseas counterparty are not allowed under the Scheme.

6. The permissible capital account transactions by an individual under LRS are:

  1. opening of foreign currency account abroad with a bank;
  2. purchase of property abroad;
  3. making investments abroad- acquisition and holding shares of both listed and unlisted overseas company or debt instruments; acquisition of qualification shares of an overseas company for holding the post of Director; acquisition of shares of a foreign company towards professional services rendered or in lieu of Director’s remuneration; investment in units of Mutual Funds, Venture Capital Funds, unrated debt securities, promissory notes;
  4. setting up Wholly Owned Subsidiaries and Joint Ventures (with effect from August 05, 2013) outside India for bonafide business subject to the terms & conditions stipulated in Notification No FEMA.263/ RB-2013 dated March 5, 2013;
  5. extending loans including loans in Indian Rupees to Non-resident Indians (NRIs) who are relatives as defined in Companies Act, 2013 .

7. The limit of USD 2,50,000 per Financial Year (FY) under the Scheme also includes/subsumes remittances for current account transactions (viz. private visit; gift/donation; going abroad on employment; emigration; maintenance of close relatives abroad; business trip; medical treatment abroad; studies abroad) available to resident individuals under Para 1 of Schedule III to Foreign Exchange Management (Current Account Transactions) Amendment Rules, 2015 dated May 26, 2015. Release of foreign exchange exceeding USD 2,50,000 requires prior permission from the Reserve Bank of India.

a. Private visits

For private visits abroad, other than to Nepal and Bhutan, any resident individual can obtain foreign exchange up to an aggregate amount of USD 2,50,000 from an Authorised Dealer or FFMC, in any one financial year, irrespective of the number of visits undertaken during the year.

Further, all tour related expenses including cost of rail/road/water transportation; cost of Euro Rail; passes/tickets, etc. outside India; and overseas hotel/lodging expenses shall be subsumed under the LRS limit. The tour operator can collect this amount either in Indian rupees or in foreign currency from the resident traveller.

b. Gift/donation

Any resident individual may remit up-to USD 2,50,000 in one FY as gift to a person residing outside India or as donation to an organization outside India.

c. Going abroad on employment

A person going abroad for employment can draw foreign exchange up to USD 2,50,000 per FY from any Authorised Dealer in India.

d. Emigration

A person wanting to emigrate can draw foreign exchange from AD Category I bank and AD Category II up to the amount prescribed by the country of emigration or USD 250,000. Remittance of any amount of foreign exchange outside India in excess of this limit may be allowed only towards meeting incidental expenses in the country of immigration and not for earning points or credits to become eligible for immigration by way of overseas investments in government bonds; land; commercial enterprise; etc.

e. Maintenance of close relatives abroad

A resident individual can remit up-to USD 2,50,000 per FY towards maintenance of close relatives [‘relative’ as defined in Section 2(77) of the Companies Act, 20137abroad.

f. Business trip

Visits by individuals in connection with attending of an international conference, seminar, specialised training, apprentice training, etc., are treated as business visits. For business trips to foreign countries, resident individuals can avail of foreign exchange up to USD 2,50,000 in a FY irrespective of the number of visits undertaken during the year.

However, if an employee is being deputed by an entity for any of the above and the expenses are borne by the latter, such expenses shall be treated as residual current account transactions outside LRS and may be permitted by the AD without any limit, subject to verifying the bonafides of the transaction.

g. Medical treatment abroad

Authorised Dealers may release foreign exchange up to an amount of USD 2,50,000 or its equivalent per FY without insisting on any estimate from a hospital/doctor. For amount exceeding the above limit, Authorised Dealers may release foreign exchange under general permission based on the estimate from the doctor in India or hospital/ doctor abroad. A person who has fallen sick after proceeding abroad may also be released foreign exchange by an Authorised Dealer (without seeking prior approval of the Reserve Bank of India) for medical treatment outside India.

In addition to the above, an amount up to USD 250,000 per financial year is allowed to a person for accompanying as attendant to a patient going abroad for medical treatment/check-up.

h. Facilities available to students for pursuing their studies abroad.

AD Category I banks and AD Category II, may release foreign exchange up to USD 2,50,000 or its equivalent to resident individuals for studies abroad without insisting on any estimate from the foreign University. However, AD Category I bank and AD Category II may allow remittances (without seeking prior approval of the Reserve Bank of India) exceeding USD 2,50,000 based on the estimate received from the institution abroad.

8. Remittances under the Scheme can be used for purchasing objects of art subject to the provisions of other applicable laws such as the extant Foreign Trade Policy of the Government of India.

9. The Scheme can be used for outward remittance in the form of a DD either in the resident individual’s own name or in the name of beneficiary with whom he intends putting through the permissible transactions at the time of private visit abroad, against self-declaration of the remitter in the format prescribed.

10. Individuals can also open, maintain and hold foreign currency accounts with a bank outside India for making remittances under the Scheme without prior approval of the Reserve Bank. The foreign currency accounts may be used for putting through all transactions connected with or arising from remittances eligible under this Scheme.

11. Banks should not extend any kind of credit facilities to resident individuals to facilitate capital account remittances under the Scheme.

12. The Scheme is not available for remittances for any purpose specifically prohibited under Schedule I or any item restricted under Schedule II of Foreign Exchange Management (Current Account Transaction) Rules, 2000, dated May 3, 2000, as amended from time to time.

13. The Scheme is not available for capital account remittances to countries identified by Financial Action Task Force (FATF) as non-co-operative countries and territories as available on FATF website www.fatf-gafi.org or as notified by the Reserve Bank. Remittances directly or indirectly to those individuals and entities identified as posing significant risk of committing acts of terrorism as advised separately by the Reserve Bank to the banks is also not permitted.

14. Documentation by the remitter

The individual will have to designate a branch of an AD through which all the remittances under the Scheme will be made.The resident individual seeking to make the remittance should furnish Form A2 as at Annex for purchase of foreign exchange under LRS.

15. It is mandatory for the resident individual to provide his/her Permanent Account Number (PAN) to make remittance under the Scheme.

16. Investor, who has remitted funds under LRS can retain, reinvest the income earned on the investments. At present, the resident individual is not required to repatriate the funds or income generated out of investments made under the Scheme. However, a resident individual who has made overseas direct investment in the equity shares; compulsorily convertible preference shares of a JV/WoS outside India, within the LRS limit, shall have to comply with the terms and conditions prescribed by the overseas investment guidelines under Notification No. FEMA 263/RB-2013 dated March 5, 2013.

17. Facility to grant loan in rupees to NRI/ PIO close relative under the Scheme

Resident individual is permitted to lend to a Non-resident Indian (NRI)/ Person of Indian Origin (PIO) close relative [‘relative’ as defined in Section 2(77) of the Companies Act, 2013 ] by way of crossed cheque/ electronic transfer subject to the following conditions:

(i) the loan is free of interest and the minimum maturity of the loan is one year;

(ii) the loan amount should be within the overall limit under the Liberalised Remittance Scheme of USD 2,50,000 per financial year available for a resident individual. It would be the responsibility of the resident individual to ensure that the amount of loan granted by him is within the LRS limit and all the remittances made by the resident individual during a given financial year including the loan together have not exceeded the limit prescribed under LRS;

(iii) the loan shall be utilized for meeting the borrower’s personal requirements or for his own business purposes in India.

(iv) the loan shall not be utilized, either singly or in association with other person for any of the activities in which investment by persons resident outside India is prohibited, namely:

  1. The business of chit fund, or
  2. Nidhi Company, or
  3. Agricultural or plantation activities or in real estate business, or construction of farm houses, or
  4. Trading in Transferable Development Rights (TDRs).

Explanation: For the purpose of item (c) above, real estate business shall not include development of townships, construction of residential/ commercial premises, roads or bridges.

(v) the loan amount should be credited to the NRO a/c of the NRI / PIO. Credit of such loan amount may be treated as an eligible credit to NRO a/c;

(vi) the loan amount shall not be remitted outside India; and

(vii) repayment of loan shall be made by way of inward remittances through normal banking channels or by debit to the Non-resident Ordinary (NRO) / Non-resident External (NRE) / Foreign Currency Non-resident (FCNR) account of the borrower or out of the sale proceeds of the shares or securities or immovable property against which such loan was granted.

18. A resident individual can make a rupee gift to a NRI/PIO who is a relative of the resident individual [‘relative’ as defined in Section 2(77) of the Companies Act, 2013 ] by way of crossed cheque /electronic transfer. The amount should be credited to the Non-Resident (Ordinary) Rupee Account (NRO) a/c of the NRI / PIO and credit of such gift amount may be treated as an eligible credit to NRO a/c. The gift amount would be within the overall limit of USD 250,000 per FY as permitted under the LRS for a resident individual. It would be the responsibility of the resident donor to ensure that the gift amount is within the LRS limit and all the remittances made by the donor during the financial year including the gift amount have not exceeded the limit prescribed under the LRS.

B. Operational instructions to Authorised Persons

1. Authorized Persons may carefully study the provisions of the Act / Regulations / Notifications issued under Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999.

2. The Reserve Bank will not, generally, prescribe the documents which should be verified by the Authorised Persons while releasing foreign exchange for current account transactions. In this connection, attention of authorized persons is drawn to sub-section (5) of Section 10 of the FEMA, 1999 which provides that an authorised person shall require any person desiring to transact in foreign exchange to make such a declaration and to give such information as will reasonably satisfy him that the transaction will not involve and is not designed for the purpose of any contravention or evasion of the provisions of the FEMA or any rule, regulation, notification, direction or order issued there under.

3. With a view to maintaining uniform practices, Authorized Dealers may consider requirements or documents to be obtained by their branches to ensure compliance with provisions of sub-section (5) of section 10 of the Act.

4. Authorised Dealers are also required to keep on record any information / documentation, on the basis of which the transaction was undertaken for verification by the Reserve Bank. In case the applicant refuses to comply with any such requirement or makes unsatisfactory compliance therewith, the Authorised Dealer shall refuse, in writing, to undertake the transaction and shall, if he has reasons to believe that any contravention / evasion is contemplated by the person, report the matter to the Reserve Bank.

5. Reserve Bank of India will not issue any instructions under the FEMA, regarding the procedure to be followed in respect of deduction of tax at source while allowing remittances to the non-residents. It shall be mandatory on the part of Authorised Dealers to comply with the requirement of the tax laws, as applicable.

6. While allowing the facility to resident individuals, Authorised Dealers are required to ensure that “Know Your Customer” guidelines have been implemented in respect of bank accounts. They should also comply with the Anti-Money Laundering Rules in force while allowing the facility.

7. The applicants should have maintained the bank account with the bank for a minimum period of one year prior to the remittances for capital account transactions. If the applicant seeking to make the remittances is a new customer of the bank, Authorised Dealers should carry out due diligence on the opening, operation and maintenance of the account. Further, the Authorised Dealers should obtain bank statement for the previous year from the applicant to satisfy themselves regarding the source of funds. If such a bank statement is not available, copies of the latest Income Tax Assessment Order or Return filed by the applicant may be obtained.

8. The Authorised Dealer should ensure that the payment is received out of funds belonging to the person seeking to make the remittances, by a cheque drawn on the applicant’s bank account or by debit to his account or by Demand Draft / Pay Order. Authorised Dealer may also accept the payment through credit /debit/prepaid card of the card holder.

9. The Authorised Dealer should certify that the remittance is not being made directly or indirectly by /or to ineligible entities and that the remittances are made in accordance with the instructions contained herein.

10. AD bank should not extend any kind of credit facilities to resident individuals to facilitate remittances for capital account transactions under the Scheme.

11. Authorised Dealer may keep a record of the countries identified by FATF as non-co-operative countries and territories and accordingly update the list from time to time for necessary action by their branches handling the transactions under the Liberalised Remittance Scheme. For this purpose, they may access the website www.fatf-gafi.org to obtain the latest list of non-co-operative countries notified by FATF.

12. The remittances made under this Scheme will be reported in FETERS in the normal course. The Authorised Dealers may also prepare and keep on record dummy Form A2, in respect of remittances less than USD 25,000. In addition, AD banks may be guided by FED Master Direction No. 18/2015-16 dated January 01, 2016 (as updated from time to time) on Reporting under FEMA, 1999 for reporting related instructions under the Scheme.

13. A number of foreign banks operating in India as well as Indian banks have been soliciting (through advertisements) foreign currency deposits (from residents under LRS) [on behalf of overseas mutual funds] or for placing at their overseas branches. These advertisements may not always contain appropriate disclosures to guide potential depositors giving rise to concerns from the point of view of protecting the interest of the resident individuals. Further, marketing in India of schemes soliciting foreign currency deposits by foreign entities, not having operational presence in India, also raises supervisory concerns. Therefore, all banks, both Indian and foreign, including those not having an operational presence in India, should seek prior approval from RBI for the schemes being marketed by them in India to residents either for soliciting foreign currency deposits for their foreign/overseas branches or for acting as agents for overseas mutual funds or any other foreign financial services company. The applications in this regard may be addressed to the Chief General Manager-in-Charge, Department of Banking Regulations, Reserve Bank of India, Central Office, 12th Floor, Fort, Mumbai -400001.

 FAQs - REMITTANCES